faith

“How are you so skinny?”

This question, among others related to my long and lean physique, is probably the most frequent question I’m asked.

I’m a ballet dancer, so most people assume I’m either:

A. Skinny BECAUSE I dance.

B. Skinny FOR dance.

C. Have an eating disorder.

Let me tell you, I’m none of these except maybe partially A. I burn a lot of calories, but I have a genetically fast metabolism and extremely evenly distributed fat. I take in all the food I need (and sometimes too much) and am at a healthy weight for my height and age.

Yes, I am tall and skinny. And yes, I can still be self-conscious about my body.

I’m not saying I should be self-conscious about my body, because I know that God  created me to be exactly the way I’m supposed to be, but I’m tired of people assuming that girls with physiques like “models” (long and skinny) don’t deserve to be uplifted as much as girls who believe they’re overweight… I mean curvy.

As long as you are taking care of your body the way you are meant to, that’s all that should matter! It’s disappointing everybody acting like body-shaming models and ballerinas and the thinner like is the best way to un-body shame curvier women.

Healthy is beautiful. Fearing the Lord is beautiful. This hamburger was really beautiful. 

That annoying Meghan Trainor song is just rude to skinny girls. 

   

 

“Charm is deceptive and beauty is fleeting, but a woman who fears the Lord is to be praised.”

Proverbs 31:30

xoxo, jordan

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2 Comments

  • Reply
    Jamie Carter
    May 5, 2016 at 9:51 pm

    Being small-framed and having a fast metabolism runs in my family, so I’ve seen the frustration of strangers telling my sister and cousins to eat more and the annoyance of them being treated as children even though they’re all adults. I remember watching in fascination as she loaded up her plate with more food than was typical for me to eat in what would be a failed attempt to purposefully gain weight. Now me, I’m nothing like her, so it’s more of a struggle. What has really helped is to choose to eat well, be educated about nutrition (the occasional consequence of a fast metabolism is vitamin deficiencies and I’ve seen how much damage that can do), eat what food I can grow from our garden, and just to be aware of the process how my food is made. What I eat well, I feel well and I feel like I look well, too. The world is going to send all these messages about what’s shameful or appropriate, but the world isn’t always right. Christians should be the ones who send the message that God loves us all, no matter what we look like – he looks to our hearts.

  • Reply
    Jamie Carter
    May 5, 2016 at 9:51 pm

    Being small-framed and having a fast metabolism runs in my family, so I’ve seen the frustration of strangers telling my sister and cousins to eat more and the annoyance of them being treated as children even though they’re all adults. I remember watching in fascination as she loaded up her plate with more food than was typical for me to eat in what would be a failed attempt to purposefully gain weight. Now me, I’m nothing like her, so it’s more of a struggle. What has really helped is to choose to eat well, be educated about nutrition (the occasional consequence of a fast metabolism is vitamin deficiencies and I’ve seen how much damage that can do), eat what food I can grow from our garden, and just to be aware of the process how my food is made. What I eat well, I feel well and I feel like I look well, too. The world is going to send all these messages about what’s shameful or appropriate, but the world isn’t always right. Christians should be the ones who send the message that God loves us all, no matter what we look like – he looks to our hearts.

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